• Royal visit!

    On 12 April 2016 - International Day for Street Children - Salaam Baalak Trust was honoured with a visit by The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.  Prince William played carrom with street children at GRP contact point where it all started; Kate drew with children in the short-term shelter at Aasra, and they both took a special interest in the work of the mental health team.   Click below for more links.  (These will continue to be added to.)

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  • A Silver Salute

    a great introductory video about SBT, made by SBT beneficiaries

    a great introductory video about SBT, made by SBT beneficiaries Watch video
  • Visiting Delhi? Book a city walk

    Since 2006, former street children at SBT have been offering visitors to New Delhi the chance to see and hear first hand about the lives of street children and the work done by the organisation.   See more, and book, here.  More recently, they have also been guiding tourists through Old Delhi in a new walk run by social enterprise Street Connections.  Both these walks are recommended in Lonely Planet and are a great way to see parts of city life that most tourists have little idea about.

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  • summer fund raising competition

    Win a trip to India!

    This summer, we are organising a fund raising competition..   SBT goody bags for everyone who raises over £150, and a trip to Delhi for two people for the one who raises the most!

    We are inviting friends, supporters, former volunteers or anyone with a connection to SBT to to tell their friends and colleagues why it's such a great cause, and have some fun in the process..

    See here for more information on how to enter, rules and conditions and so on.

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  • How to help!

    You can help us in less than a minute

    There are many ways to help...   Donations are always welcome, but simply going through this site and spreading the word is important, too.  Follow us on Facebook.

    Help us raise funds in the UK... connect with a school.. for those who can, why not consider volunteering in Delhi? 

     

     

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Salaam Baalak Trust

  • Street children in India

    India has made great strides in reducing poverty over the last years, but millions of Indian children still lack adequate care and protection.  Without shelter, education or family support, they struggle to survive on the fringes of India's economic explosion.  Many street children choose to run away from a broken home or beatings at school.  Some are orphaned, while others live on the streets together with their families.  Some are lured by the hope of better opportunities in the city.  Some are trafficked; some simply get lost.  Whatever their reason for being on the streets, they are all highly vulnerable.  Many enjoy the life of freedom and living for the present.  But the harsher reality is that they are likely to face the effects of gangs, knife crime, drugs or illness.

  • Salaam Baalak Trust

    Salaam Baalak Trust, an Indian NGO, was set up in 1988 after the success of Mira Nair's film Salaam Bombay.   It started with a contact point at New Delhi station with 3 members of staff and about 20 children.  More than 25 years on, social workers at the same contact point meet about 1,000 new children a year within hours or days of their arriving at the station.  SBT has grown steadily in response to overhwelming need and now has 6 shelter homes (4 for boys and 2 for girls) and a mobile school that visits slum areas.  In runs programmes in education, healthcare, mental health, sports and the arts.  From an initial focus on runaway children, they now also work with street-living families, and in total, their staff reach out to about 6,000 children a year.  

  • Friends of SBT

    Friends of Salaam Baalak Trust (UK) was set up in 2009 as a UK registered charity by a small group of people in London who had been inspired by the work of Salaam Baalak Trust in Delhi.  Our aims are to raise funds for street children and awareness of the issues they face.  As a small organisation with almost no overheads, virtually every penny we raise goes directly to street and working children.  Most of it is routed through SBT itself, and its use overseen by us.  Sometimes we fund directly an individual child's needs or the requirements of a particular centre.

The statistics

  • 40% of under 5s are malnourished

  • 50% of children do not attend school regularly

  • Child labour figure estimated at 60 million

  • Two thirds of children are victims of physical abuse